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"LET THE PEOPLES SING" – 2011

Salford, Manchester 15 -16 October

"DRAGOSTIN FOLK" – Bulgaria

PROGRAMME

For the concert on 15th October 2011

The repertoire of choir formation Dragostin Folk is based completely on works by Stefan Dragostinov. They have been inspired by the treasure and style diversity of different regions in Bulgaria.

"Dragostin Folk" presents:

Sonic Icons of Bulgaria

1. Bulgarian Benediction (Български благослов)

This short song starts with the well know address to God, asking for good health and happy life, and ends with Amen. These are words expressing the desire for the good, words that unite and multiply human strength in search for prosperity.
First Performance – 29. 04. 2011, Varna Ca – 0:40

2. My Uncle's Horses (Чичовите коне)

is like a rush to the timbre vividness of the region Shoplouk, where diaphonia – treble falsetto whoops - the sharp sound - dominate in depicting emotions and characters. On that land live people who love playing tricks, imposing their shrewdness and harshness, but most of all, people who love enjoying themselves. The master goes to a wedding. But before he leaves, he harnesses the horses, puts vivid decoration on them, and combs their wild manes. So, the horses also anticipate the revelry and the wild trip. This pleasant ado and sweet anticipation of the forthcoming event is part of the very feast, which has actually started with the preparations.
First Performance – 07. 03. 1994, Viena Ca – 1:50

3. Gandyovitsa (Гандювица)

«Vuhh!» ("Wow!") is a typical Bulgarian exclamation with a lot of nuances in its meaning, like teasing or dreamy anticipation. As well as it expresses the impulse, stimulus, urge for action which is expected to end in a positive way. «Vuh!» is the refrain in a story that tells about the roof of a village church. It was leaking and water was running along the bride's veil. Master Gandyo started putting on tiles to secure shelter over the heads of the young couple in the brightest day of their lives together. The melody starts off from the exclamation to take on life that carries bright emotions and dreams.
First Performance - 15. 10. 2011, Salford (Manchester) Ca – 2:30

Rofinka (Рофинка)

Rofinka – the saddest Bulgarian song – is a deep touching wail for the early broken dream. "It is springtime, the earth is awakening for life and I am going to the dark ground", says ill Rofinka to her mother. The illness takes her from her fiancée and her friends. In Rhodope Mountain it is one of the most popular songs – an incredible mixture of adoration to beauty and a protest against the unfair destiny. The memory of the exceptionally beautiful and hard-working lass has been alive in her village, Poprelka, for 150 years now. People say that on her grave grows a rare kind of a white flower. Nowadays, enriched with the means of polyphony, the melody is like a multi-voice hymn. The tragic shock and thirst for life come deep from the heart, it is as if it starts from one hill of the mountain and soars up with multiplied strength.
First Performance – 07. 03. 1997, Bratislava Ca – 5:20

5. Digu-digu Di (Дигу-дигу ди)

is a song that presents the elevated atmosphere of a spring holiday by the river Danube. With the first heralds of the reviving nature, the young girls gather to rejoice the spring freshness; to collect their first bunches of flowers, to dream and to romp. The refrain "digi- digi, digu-digu" is a vocal imitation of the "gadulka" (rebeck) – an old folklore musical instrument, which in the hands of virtuosos becomes like a source of incessant energy. With this onomatopoeia the girls accompany their joyful plays and look at the reviving nature that goes in synchrony with the flights of their juvenile fantasies.
First Performance 24. 05. 2009, Saratov, Russia Са – 3:00

Net Time – 13:30 Total Time – 14:10

Elena Dragostinova

"LET THE PEOPLES SING" – 2011

Salford, Manchester 15 -16 October

"DRAGOSTIN FOLK" – Bulgaria

PROGRAMME

For the concert on 16th October 2011

The repertoire of choir formation Dragostin Folk is based completely on works by Stefan Dragostinov. They have been inspired by the treasure and style diversity of different regions in Bulgaria.

"Dragostin Folk" presents:

Sonic Icons of Bulgaria

1. Granny Onion Planted (Баба лук посела)

This song is a humorous parable for the unexpected discrepancy between the intended and the result. Granny planted onion. It grew and grew, till it reached the roof. Pulled Granny, pulled, but no one could help her pull it out. And suddenly onion said, "Granny, you planted no onion, but a tree. When I have quinces, you can easily shake them down." Here is a conclusion from this comic story: every job requires not only efforts but also knowing the exact way to do it. Musical language which tells the story, with unexpected turns, is a kaleidoscope of irregular rhythms. The composer selected them from folklore of North-western Bulgaria.
First Performance – 07. 03. 1997, Viena Ca - 2:10

2. Perushtitsa is in Flames (Запали се Перущица)

A dove is flying over the ashes and spreading the sad story of Perushtitsa. Perushtitsa is a town in Bulgaria, at the foot of Phodope Mountain. In 1876 its citizens fought for freedom against the mighty Ottoman Empire. The uprising was atrociously stopped. Among the ashes of the burned town, from 2000 survive only 150 people. The melody was discovered in an ancient book. Probably it was composed by a refugee who witnessed the tragic events. It is evidence that at those times songs were the live newspapers of people. Nowadays the composer has turned the historical event in an outcry for peace. On the verge of despair, the ballad is like a silent sigh in the burned temple. It is also a loud prayer for life, sent directly to the dome in the sky.
First Performance – 11. 01. 1997, Sofia Ca – 3:40 3.

Yanina (Янина)

The region around the southern town of Kyustendil is a crossroad of cultures. The place is a meeting point of melodies and rhythms that come from Bulgaria, Greece, Serbia, and Macedonia; and even from the region of the Adriatic Sea - a feast of sound. It shines with its own impressive power. In its colour unique vocal techniques weave, mastered only by master singers – "open" singing, hiccups, trembling. It is as if winds from different directions race for dominance, only to meet in a harmonious chaos. Even the story in this song is unbelievable and paradoxical – one workman put into his head to measure up the vast Sofia field with a metre. And, just think of it – he made it!
First Performance – 16. October, Salford, Manchester Ca – 1:40

4. Ghu-ghu-ghu I-ghu (Гу-гу-гу и-гу)

This song is like a sunny smile because it tells the story of a happy love. A boy and a girl love each other. They are on the border between childhood and youth. So, their love is like a carefree game, a stream of joy, jokes, talking and singing. The musical language is typical for the region, -Shoplouka – the region around the capital of Sofia. Singing in two voices and the so called "shopska diaphonia" have been overexposed to give maximum dynamics and light emotion.
First Performance – 16. October, Salford, Manchester Ca – 2:00

Net Time: 9:30 Total Time: 10:00

Elena Dragostinova